A Travellerspoint blog

May 17, 2018 — Dunster and Exmoor National Park

Dunster was a wonderful surprise; Selworthy had the thatched houses I wanted to photograph and the Cliff Railway in Lynmouth was great fun.


View Southwest England and Northern England on Beausoleil's travel map.

The Foresters Arms on West Street, Dunster

The Foresters Arms on West Street, Dunster

Light clouds and sunshine so we decided it was a good day for the Exmoor National Park. We easily found the A396 at Tiverton and set the GPS for Dunster where we knew we were to turn west for Selworthy. It worked and we noted that Dunster was a beautiful little market town. We found the turn for Selworthy and were on one-lane two-way roads. Fortunately it was not far. We tried the parking across from the church but if we parked in any of the vacant marked spots, the other car couldn’t possibly get out. Not good. We decided to park up on the road and were soon walking into the cute thatched village. It seems to be owned by the National Trust and there’s a gift shop and tea shop in two of the thatched buildings. A little stream rushes through the town and it is gorgeous. It was small and we were soon back to the car and going on to Lynmouth. Selworthy Green National Trust Site, Exmoor, near Minehead, Somerset; tel: +44 (0)1643 862452; Click here for Selworthy Green National Trust web site

West Street in Dunster, UK

West Street in Dunster, UK

Dunster Yarn Market on High Street

Dunster Yarn Market on High Street

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green

Periwinkle Cottage Tea Room on Selworthy Green

Periwinkle Cottage Tea Room on Selworthy Green

Ivy's Cottage at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Ivy's Cottage at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Bow Cottage on Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Bow Cottage on Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Exmoor National Park

Exmoor National Park


On the way, you cross barren moorland and we were lucky enough to see some Exmoor Ponies by the road . . . no, on the road. We rounded a bend and saw Lynton on the hill opposite . . . very dramatic with Lynmouth directly below. As we entered the lower town of Lynmouth, we saw a sign to parking so we drove directly to it, parked, paid and displayed then headed into town looking for lunch. Click here for the Exmoor National Park web site

Exmoor Ponies from the A39 through Exmoor National Park

Exmoor Ponies from the A39 through Exmoor National Park

Lynton from Countisbury Hill

Lynton from Countisbury Hill

"The Walker" by Richard Graham

"The Walker" by Richard Graham


Checked every restaurant in town and none looked very appealing. We finally gave up and stopped in a café for fish and chips with a very nice local dark ale. We went to a local fudge shop for dessert and then walked to the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway and got our tickets. Several extremely heavy English women got on and there was no room for us so we waited for the next train where I ended up helping another very heavy older woman get on. It took four of us to get her on the train . . . only one step! After that excitement, a couple with three large dogs entered. An interesting ride up the cliff . . . Lynton & Lynmouth Lift Co, The Cliff Railway, The Esplanade, Lynmouth, North Devon, EX35 6EQ; tel: +44 (0)1598 753486; Click here for the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway web site

Low tide along the West Lyn River into the Bristol Channel

Low tide along the West Lyn River into the Bristol Channel

Riverside Road in Lynmouth

Riverside Road in Lynmouth

Lynmouth Street in Lynmouth, the shopping street

Lynmouth Street in Lynmouth, the shopping street

The Cliff Railway, the world's steepest water-powered railway

The Cliff Railway, the world's steepest water-powered railway

From the top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton

From the top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton


At the top we walked into Lynton where the first restaurant we saw was the Cracker Barrel . . . shades of Mansfield, Ohio where we used to eat with my mother! We walked through town and visited their tiny museum then hiked back up the hill to wait for our train. Only one small dog on this train.

The Cracker Barrel Restaurant at the top of the Cliff Railway

The Cracker Barrel Restaurant at the top of the Cliff Railway

View of Alford Terrace from Stable Mews

View of Alford Terrace from Stable Mews

Stable Mews with a view across the valley

Stable Mews with a view across the valley

Lee Road looking down Queen Street

Lee Road looking down Queen Street

Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin Lynton

Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin Lynton

Lyn and Exmoor Museum

Lyn and Exmoor Museum

Lyn and Exmoor Museum - Exhibits

Lyn and Exmoor Museum - Exhibits

Lynton Town Hall

Lynton Town Hall

Lynton Arts Center beside the Town Hall

Lynton Arts Center beside the Town Hall

Top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton <br />on our way home

Top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton
on our way home


We opted for the easy way home and took the A39 to A399 to A361 to Tiverton, much faster but not as picturesque. I transferred photos and then we walked partway down the canal outside our door. There is an aqueduct that takes the canal over what used to be a train track. We passed lots of barges, all anchored and were followed most of the way by four begging ducks. It’s all very pretty. Our landlady was here during the day and we have clean towels. I think it’s an apology for all the dead flies that I had to clean up. She also shorted us one hand towel. It’s a strange place. She is very nice, but the flies were disgusting and it gets so hot with the all-glass ceiling and walls, not to mention it’s so bright you can’t see the tv very well until past my bedtime when it finally gets dark. There is also the problem with the smell from the neighboring cows when the wind is from that direction . . . All in all, we wouldn't stay in Canal Cottage again, but the area is lovely and we both really like Tiverton.

Posted by Beausoleil 16:04 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged uk exmoor lynton lynmouth dunster exmoor_national_park

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Comments

A shame the cottage isn't so nice, but you seem to have enjoyed the surrounding area a lot. I love Selworthy, though it's admittedly very 'chocolate box' ;)

by ToonSarah

Chocolate box it is, but I was desperately looking for thatched cottages to paint. This was heaven for thatched cottages! I've already used one photo for a painting and it was just accepted into a local show. Hooray for the chocolate box! ;)

by Beausoleil

Indeed - these things are on chocolate boxes (and postcards, and calendars) for a reason :)

by ToonSarah

I can well remember when the funicular in Wiesbaden (near Frankfurt) was still run by water power. Each car had a water tank which was filled at the top and drained at the bottom. I suppose there was no danger of a water shortage in those days.

by Nemorino

Those cottages look really nice, I would love to see how you're painting turned out :-)

by Stefmuts

Hi Stefanie. I've only got one thatched cottage done right now and it's in Sandy Lane where we went on the 23rd. I have no idea how to put a picture in here so I'll send it in a Message to you. Thatched cottages are so beautiful.

by Beausoleil

I just stumbled upon your blog and it brought nice memories. I visited Selworthy in the mid-seventies
and I still remember it as very cute.
In Lynmouth, I recall seeing large displays about
the 1952 flooding. Is this forgotten now?

by leonito

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