A Travellerspoint blog

July 2018

May 13, 2018 — Mother's Day in the USA

Today I got to open my Mother's Day presents we brought with us. Then we drove to Exeter to visit the famous Cathedral and the Royal Albert Memorial Museum.


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Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral

Woke this morning to discover it’s Mother’s Day. I brought Jean’s card along and Ed gave me a cat video that I have to wait to watch . . . torture. Peg sent me an e-card since her gift was not brought because I was trying to keep luggage light. She gave me two amazing flavored vinegars and they might have been difficult to get on the plane anyway. Angie and Charles sent a really lovely photo of the whole family taken at my Mom’s memorial service in 2005. We’ve all gotten older! How did that happen?

The Martyr's Pulpit in the Nave of Exeter Cathedral

The Martyr's Pulpit in the Nave of Exeter Cathedral


After breakfast we took the old road into Exeter hoping for minimal traffic on a Sunday. It worked. We drove directly to the Mary Arches parking lot where a nice young couple got us into the lot and explained the token system. Next, two young women got us out of the lot on foot and helped us find the main street. Once on the street, a friendly gentleman helped us find the Exeter Cathedral where we were in time for the morning service. With organ and choir, it was an amazing experience. After the service, we went to the desk to pay our 7.50£ each to visit the Cathedral and the pleasant young man wouldn’t charge us because we’d attended the service. We thoroughly explored the magnificent church and bought two books in the shop.

Cathedral Church of Saint Peter in Exeter

Cathedral Church of Saint Peter in Exeter

Astronomical Clock in Exeter Cathedral

Astronomical Clock in Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral - Lady Chapel and side aisle

Exeter Cathedral - Lady Chapel and side aisle

Tomb of Bishop Stafford (1419) in Exeter Cathedral

Tomb of Bishop Stafford (1419) in Exeter Cathedral

Cloisters of Exeter Cathedral (with picnic tables)

Cloisters of Exeter Cathedral (with picnic tables)


We left the Cathedral, checked the cloister (with picnic tables) and walked up toward town looking for lunch. We immediately spotted The Tea on the Green in a beautiful half-timbered building. They offered a Sunday roast so we entered and were seated. Ed got the beef and I got the lamb with a Yorkshire pudding on the side. Both were excellent as was the service. Ed got the Eton Mess for dessert and I got a chocolate trio of mousse, cake and ice cream. Great meal and a truly wonderful wait staff. Tea on the Green, 2 Cathedral Cl., Exeter EX1 1EZ; tel: +44 (0)1392 276913; info@teaonthegreen.com; Click here for Tea on the Green web site

*****

Lunch at The Tea on the Green

Lunch at The Tea on the Green

Umbrellas on high . . . on High Street, Exeter

Umbrellas on high . . . on High Street, Exeter


Our waiter gave us directions to the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM) and as we walked there, we saw an exhibit of brightly colored umbrellas hanging above High Street so made a detour to photograph them. It reminded us of a similar exhibit we saw in Angers, France in 2016. Fun!

We continued to RAMM, entered and discovered it’s free. We spent the afternoon exploring the various collections including a long section of the Roman Wall that used to completely surround the town and has been preserved. The paintings section was not inspiring but the cultural collection was interesting. They even had a moose which we hadn't seen since we toured Alaska years ago. The moose we saw in Alaska was alive and nearly ran in front of our car. It was as frightened as we were and all of us came out of it in fine shape . . . thankfully.

Entrance Plaque

Entrance Plaque

Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery in Exeter (RAMM)

Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery in Exeter (RAMM)

Roman wall that used to completely surround Exeter

Roman wall that used to completely surround Exeter

Exhibit in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter

Exhibit in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter

Walked back to parking, retrieved the car and drove home meeting the only rude Englishman we’ve seen so far on a one-lane bridge. He made us back up and let him through even though we were much farther across the bridge than he was. We did and fortunately everyone behind us backed up politely.

Otherwise, it was a great day . . . even had sunshine all day.

Posted by Beausoleil 15:41 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged museums uk devon exeter Comments (1)

May 14, 2018 — Killerton House and Gardens

A lovely day at Killerton House and Gardens and a tiny disappointment in Broadclyst


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Killerton House Entrance

Killerton House Entrance

Started the day with laundry. Done and hung, we set out for Killerton House and Gardens. It wasn’t far but most of the roads were one-lane with two-way traffic so it was slow. Google did take us right to the National Trust parking lot so we parked and entered . . . a bit early. Fortunately they opened a bit early so we walked around the gardens for a few minutes before going into the house. They are doing a special exhibit on Women’s Suffrage and it was very interesting. We walked through the entire house with the usual excellent docents.

Killerton House Exhibit Information

Killerton House Exhibit Information


The Women's Suffrage exhibit was interesting because there were several women living in Killerton House at the time of the Suffrage Movement and they did not all agree. It was fun to read their differing opinions and the reasoning behind them. I know my own grandmother could not vote when she was a young woman and was quite proud that she could do so even when it was common. The site has a restaurant and we decided to try it. Ed got the chicken thigh and I was brave and ordered pork belly which was actually very good. We both got sticky toffee pudding for dessert . . . rich but delicious. The only sour note was the estate-bottled cider that I tried. It had a distinct aftertaste of manure. Not as bad as the Norman hard cider we tried years ago, but close . . . too close. Back to wine tomorrow!

Killerton House

Killerton House

Killerton House Musical Instruments

Killerton House Musical Instruments

Killerton House Dining Room

Killerton House Dining Room

Killerton House Library

Killerton House Library

Killerton House Kitchen (the restaurant)

Killerton House Kitchen (the restaurant)

Sign for the Garden Tour at Killerton House

Sign for the Garden Tour at Killerton House


There was a garden tour at 2:30 so while we waited, we wandered in the garden and then went down to meet the tour led by a volunteer named John who was very good. The tour lasted an hour as John walked us through the gardens giving us history and botanical information. We started with nine people and ended with seven, but it was interesting and informative. We also walked to the Killerton Chapel and visited it. Killerton House, Broadclyst, Exeter, Devon, EX5 3LE; tel: +44 (0)01392881345; Click here for the Killerton House National Trust web site

Rhododendrons in the Killerton House Gardens

Rhododendrons in the Killerton House Gardens

Rhododendrons in the Killerton House Gardens

Rhododendrons in the Killerton House Gardens

Rhododendrens at Killerton House Gardens

Rhododendrens at Killerton House Gardens

The Bear's Hut at Killerton House Gardens

The Bear's Hut at Killerton House Gardens

Stained Glass window in the Bear's Hut at Killerton House

Stained Glass window in the Bear's Hut at Killerton House

Wildflowers in the Killerton House Gardens

Wildflowers in the Killerton House Gardens

Killerton Chapel

Killerton Chapel

The Rose Window at Killerton Chapel

The Rose Window at Killerton Chapel

View from Killerton House Gardens

View from Killerton House Gardens


We got the car and drove to Broadclyst to see Clyston Mill. Had no trouble parking and followed signs to the churchyard where the signs disappeared. A young lady walking a very cute dog saved us. She took us across the churchyard and pointed out a gate on the far side, so we trekked through the graveyard, through the gate and across a field to a locked gate with a sign saying “Mon.-Fri. Open 1-5" and it was 4:45 and obviously not open despite the sign.

Thatched house in Poltimore on the way to Broadclyst

Thatched house in Poltimore on the way to Broadclyst

Thatched house in Broadclyst, Devon

Thatched house in Broadclyst, Devon

St. John the Baptist Church in Broadclyst

St. John the Baptist Church in Broadclyst

The Red Lion Inn in Broadclyst, Devon

The Red Lion Inn in Broadclyst, Devon

St. John the Baptist Church in Broadclyst graveyard

St. John the Baptist Church in Broadclyst graveyard

Misleading sign to Clyston Mill - It was closed.

Misleading sign to Clyston Mill - It was closed.

Back through the Churchyard

Back through the Churchyard

We plodded back through field, cemetery and town to the car and started home which involved the one-lane roads again, but we made it and our laundry was dry. Brought in the clothes and put them away and I think we can relax for the evening.

Posted by Beausoleil 16:14 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged gardens uk devon killerton_house Comments (1)

May 15, 2018 — Totnes on the steam train

A fun trip on the South Devon Railway starting in Buckfastleigh


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Buckfastleigh South Devon Railway Station

Buckfastleigh South Devon Railway Station

Train day . . . We had decided to try the South Devon Railway today so set off for Buckfastleigh to start our journey. Blessedly it was M5 most of the way so it didn’t take long to get there. Lots of free parking at the cute little steam train station and we arrived in plenty of time for the first train. Got our tickets and boarded for the seven-mile ride to Totnes. You go along the river Dare, stopping once at Staverton and then continuing to Totnes. It’s a beautiful ride. Click here for the South Devon Railway web site

Buckfastleigh Station for the South Devon Railway

Buckfastleigh Station for the South Devon Railway

Leaving Buckfastleigh on the South Devon Railway

Leaving Buckfastleigh on the South Devon Railway

Nearing Totnes on the South Devon Railway

Nearing Totnes on the South Devon Railway

Totnes Station on the South Devon Railway

Totnes Station on the South Devon Railway

Totnes Station on the South Devon Railway

Totnes Station on the South Devon Railway

Fore Street in Totnes

Fore Street in Totnes


At Totnes we got off the train and walked into town to see what was there. We walked through town looking for both lunch and the castle and had no luck with either, but did discover the Church of Saint Mary so looked through it. We finally decided on a pizza place called Rumour because they listed a couple fish dinners on their menu. However, once inside the fish disappeared except for hake which we don’t particularly like so we decided on bruschetta for a light lunch and I phoned Frou Frou in Tiverton for an evening reservation. The bruschetta at Rumour, incidentally, was delicious and a great light lunch. Rumour Restaurant and Wine Bar, 30 High Street, Totnes TQ9 5RY; tel: +44 (0)1803 864682; Click here for the Rumour Restaurant web site

Advertising sign for a local charity in Totnes

Advertising sign for a local charity in Totnes

Church of St. Mary, Totnes

Church of St. Mary, Totnes

Church of St. Mary, Totnes

Church of St. Mary, Totnes

The Willis Organ and the Kempe Stained Glass Window in St. Mary's

The Willis Organ and the Kempe Stained Glass Window in St. Mary's

Church of St. Mary, Totnes

Church of St. Mary, Totnes

Elizabethan Market on Civic Square just off High Street, Totnes

Elizabethan Market on Civic Square just off High Street, Totnes

Rumours Restaurant in Totnes

Rumours Restaurant in Totnes

Totnes Castle

Totnes Castle

Back to the castle search . . . We tried following the town map but ended up on a corner trying to figure out where to go. A nice man walked out of his shop and asked if we were lost. Well, yes! We said we were trying to find the missing castle and he said, “Follow me. You won’t believe this.” He walked a few feet to the corner and pointed back where we’d been and there was the castle with flag flying. We hadn’t looked up. He said to go back down and take the third left and then told a group of four standing there to follow us. They did. Lo and behold, we followed directions and the castle magically appeared. How do you hide a castle? We watched a couple climbing a very steep path up to the shell of a castle and decided we’d take our photos from there and continue on to see what else was in Totnes. As we walked back downhill, we spotted the Totnes Elizabethan House Museum so entered. It’s an Elizabethan era house with various exhibits including life in Elizabethan times, a history of photography and a room devoted to Charles Babbit, father of the computer, who was from Totnes. Totnes Elizabethan House Museum, 70 Fore St., Totnes TQ9 5RU; tel: +44 (0)1803 863821; Click here for the Totnes Museum web site

Totnes Castle

Totnes Castle

Elizabethan Charity Market in Totnes

Elizabethan Charity Market in Totnes

East Gate Arch and clock works in the Totnes Museum

East Gate Arch and clock works in the Totnes Museum

Totnes Elizabethan House and Museum on Fore Street

Totnes Elizabethan House and Museum on Fore Street

Totnes Elizabethan House and Museum on Fore Street

Totnes Elizabethan House and Museum on Fore Street

Bridge over the river Dart walking back to<br />the South Devon Railway Station

Bridge over the river Dart walking back to
the South Devon Railway Station


We walked back down to the train station in time to catch the 3:00 return to Buckfastleigh . . . equally pretty going back. Stopped in the café for water and the very fun gift shop that has lots of train items. If you like model trains, you can get nearly anything you need here. Then we set our Google GPS for the multi-story parking in Tiverton and made it back without any one-lane roads.

*****

South Devon Railway Steam Engine

South Devon Railway Steam Engine

River Dart near the Buckfastleigh station of the South Devon Railway

River Dart near the Buckfastleigh station of the South Devon Railway

South Devon Railways Station in Buckfastleigh

South Devon Railways Station in Buckfastleigh

Street Signs in Tiverton, Devon, UK

Street Signs in Tiverton, Devon, UK


Parked in Tiverton and did our shopping at Marks & Spencer Food Hall, then toured Tiverton until Frou Frou opened . . . we thought. Internet was wrong and we had a half-hour wait so sat at one of their outdoor tables. When they opened, the waitress came out and got us. We got the same table we’d had Saturday. We ordered a kir and later our dinners. Ed got the sea bass and I got a “chump” of lamb . . . both delicious. Ed got lemon sorbet with limoncello and I got vanilla ice cream, two small biscuits and an espresso for dessert. We love Frou Frou!

Statue of Edward the Peacemaker in Tiverton

Statue of Edward the Peacemaker in Tiverton

Scene along the river Lowman in Tiverton, Devon, UK

Scene along the river Lowman in Tiverton, Devon, UK

An ancient alms house that is still in use as an alms house

An ancient alms house that is still in use as an alms house

Frou Frou Café Bistro in Tiverton - a favorite

Frou Frou Café Bistro in Tiverton - a favorite

Frou Frou Café Bistro in Tiverton - a favorite

Frou Frou Café Bistro in Tiverton - a favorite

I charged my phone during dinner so Google got us safely home. Very fun day.

Posted by Beausoleil 16:53 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged museums restaurants uk tiverton totnes steam-train buckfastleigh frou_frou Comments (3)

May 16, 2018 — Montacute House

The day we didn't go the Exmoor National Park . . .


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Wisteria at Montacute House

Wisteria at Montacute House

We were thinking of an Exmoor National Park tour today but woke to clouds and fog and threat of rain. On to Plan B . . . We quickly consulted our National Trust book and decided on Montacute House. We started into Tiverton to fool our GPS onto the M5 via the A261. It worked and we were soon zipping along good roads to Montacute.

Montacute House from the side walkway

Montacute House from the side walkway


We arrived as they were opening and got in the first guided tour with Maria who was excellent. She gave us a history of the Elizabethan Manor House and took us around the outside explaining what it would be like to arrive as a guest in Elizabethan times. This involved walking through a meadow full of sheep with many lively and very cute lambs. Great fun! Of course you had to watch where you walked . . .

Montacute House from the Front Pasture

Montacute House from the Front Pasture

Gate tower at Montacute House

Gate tower at Montacute House

Sheep in front of Montacute House

Sheep in front of Montacute House

Sheep at Montacute House

Sheep at Montacute House

Montacute House from the front pasture

Montacute House from the front pasture

Gate Tower at Montacute House

Gate Tower at Montacute House

Montacute House Gardens - the famous wibbly wobbly hedges

Montacute House Gardens - the famous wibbly wobbly hedges

Middle Street walking from Montacute House to the Kings Arms Inn

Middle Street walking from Montacute House to the Kings Arms Inn


After the tour we walked into town for lunch and following Maria’s directions, soon arrived at The King’s Arms Inn beside the church. We opened the restaurant and ordered a confit duck, noodles, bok choy and something else in a soy-ginger sauce. It arrived in a big bowl and was very oriental in style. It was good but not something I’d order again. The Chilean cabernet we got with it was very good. Ed got a sorbet and crème brûlée of some kind and I got a chocolate brioche in crème anglais with coffee-walnut ice cream. It was very good. The Kings Arms Inn, 49 Bishopston, Montacute TA15 6UU; +44 (0)1935 822255; Click here for the Kings Arms Inn web site

Wisteria in Montacute

Wisteria in Montacute

St. Catherine next to the Kings Arms Inn

St. Catherine next to the Kings Arms Inn

The Kings Arms Inn in Montacute

The Kings Arms Inn in Montacute

The Kings Arms Inn in Montacute

The Kings Arms Inn in Montacute

St. Catherine's Church in Montacute

St. Catherine's Church in Montacute


After lunch we checked the ancient church next door then walked back to Montacute House to visit the inside. We clambered through the house and checked the “longest covered gallery in England” with their portraits on loan from the National Portrait Gallery. It was very well organized and displayed. The docents were good as all the National Trust people seem to be. Montacute House, Somerset TA15 6XP; tel: +44 (0)1935 823289; Click here for the Montacute House web site

Phelips Monument in St. Catherine's Church

Phelips Monument in St. Catherine's Church

Organ and Wagon Roof at St. Catherine's Church

Organ and Wagon Roof at St. Catherine's Church

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House Library

Montacute House Library

Montacute House

Montacute House

Montacute House Portrait Gallery

Montacute House Portrait Gallery

Montacute House

Montacute House

Antique Rolls Royce cars in the Montacute House parking lot

Antique Rolls Royce cars in the Montacute House parking lot


Afterward we walked to the car park and quickly noticed some very unusual cars. There were five antique Rolls Royces in the parking lot so I whipped out my camera for photos!

We found our way back to the M5, drove to Tiverton to get bread for supper and are relaxing by the canal now.

Posted by Beausoleil 17:33 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged sheep uk devon devonshire montacute_house montacute Comments (4)

May 17, 2018 — Dunster and Exmoor National Park

Dunster was a wonderful surprise; Selworthy had the thatched houses I wanted to photograph and the Cliff Railway in Lynmouth was great fun.


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The Foresters Arms on West Street, Dunster

The Foresters Arms on West Street, Dunster

Light clouds and sunshine so we decided it was a good day for the Exmoor National Park. We easily found the A396 at Tiverton and set the GPS for Dunster where we knew we were to turn west for Selworthy. It worked and we noted that Dunster was a beautiful little market town. We found the turn for Selworthy and were on one-lane two-way roads. Fortunately it was not far. We tried the parking across from the church but if we parked in any of the vacant marked spots, the other car couldn’t possibly get out. Not good. We decided to park up on the road and were soon walking into the cute thatched village. It seems to be owned by the National Trust and there’s a gift shop and tea shop in two of the thatched buildings. A little stream rushes through the town and it is gorgeous. It was small and we were soon back to the car and going on to Lynmouth. Selworthy Green National Trust Site, Exmoor, near Minehead, Somerset; tel: +44 (0)1643 862452; Click here for Selworthy Green National Trust web site

West Street in Dunster, UK

West Street in Dunster, UK

Dunster Yarn Market on High Street

Dunster Yarn Market on High Street

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green

Clematis Cottage Gift Shop and Gallery at Selworthy Green

Periwinkle Cottage Tea Room on Selworthy Green

Periwinkle Cottage Tea Room on Selworthy Green

Ivy's Cottage at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Ivy's Cottage at Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Bow Cottage on Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Bow Cottage on Selworthy Green on the Holnicote Estate

Exmoor National Park

Exmoor National Park


On the way, you cross barren moorland and we were lucky enough to see some Exmoor Ponies by the road . . . no, on the road. We rounded a bend and saw Lynton on the hill opposite . . . very dramatic with Lynmouth directly below. As we entered the lower town of Lynmouth, we saw a sign to parking so we drove directly to it, parked, paid and displayed then headed into town looking for lunch. Click here for the Exmoor National Park web site

Exmoor Ponies from the A39 through Exmoor National Park

Exmoor Ponies from the A39 through Exmoor National Park

Lynton from Countisbury Hill

Lynton from Countisbury Hill

"The Walker" by Richard Graham

"The Walker" by Richard Graham


Checked every restaurant in town and none looked very appealing. We finally gave up and stopped in a café for fish and chips with a very nice local dark ale. We went to a local fudge shop for dessert and then walked to the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway and got our tickets. Several extremely heavy English women got on and there was no room for us so we waited for the next train where I ended up helping another very heavy older woman get on. It took four of us to get her on the train . . . only one step! After that excitement, a couple with three large dogs entered. An interesting ride up the cliff . . . Lynton & Lynmouth Lift Co, The Cliff Railway, The Esplanade, Lynmouth, North Devon, EX35 6EQ; tel: +44 (0)1598 753486; Click here for the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway web site

Low tide along the West Lyn River into the Bristol Channel

Low tide along the West Lyn River into the Bristol Channel

Riverside Road in Lynmouth

Riverside Road in Lynmouth

Lynmouth Street in Lynmouth, the shopping street

Lynmouth Street in Lynmouth, the shopping street

The Cliff Railway, the world's steepest water-powered railway

The Cliff Railway, the world's steepest water-powered railway

From the top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton

From the top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton


At the top we walked into Lynton where the first restaurant we saw was the Cracker Barrel . . . shades of Mansfield, Ohio where we used to eat with my mother! We walked through town and visited their tiny museum then hiked back up the hill to wait for our train. Only one small dog on this train.

The Cracker Barrel Restaurant at the top of the Cliff Railway

The Cracker Barrel Restaurant at the top of the Cliff Railway

View of Alford Terrace from Stable Mews

View of Alford Terrace from Stable Mews

Stable Mews with a view across the valley

Stable Mews with a view across the valley

Lee Road looking down Queen Street

Lee Road looking down Queen Street

Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin Lynton

Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin Lynton

Lyn and Exmoor Museum

Lyn and Exmoor Museum

Lyn and Exmoor Museum - Exhibits

Lyn and Exmoor Museum - Exhibits

Lynton Town Hall

Lynton Town Hall

Lynton Arts Center beside the Town Hall

Lynton Arts Center beside the Town Hall

Top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton <br />on our way home

Top of the Cliff Railway in Lynton
on our way home


We opted for the easy way home and took the A39 to A399 to A361 to Tiverton, much faster but not as picturesque. I transferred photos and then we walked partway down the canal outside our door. There is an aqueduct that takes the canal over what used to be a train track. We passed lots of barges, all anchored and were followed most of the way by four begging ducks. It’s all very pretty. Our landlady was here during the day and we have clean towels. I think it’s an apology for all the dead flies that I had to clean up. She also shorted us one hand towel. It’s a strange place. She is very nice, but the flies were disgusting and it gets so hot with the all-glass ceiling and walls, not to mention it’s so bright you can’t see the tv very well until past my bedtime when it finally gets dark. There is also the problem with the smell from the neighboring cows when the wind is from that direction . . . All in all, we wouldn't stay in Canal Cottage again, but the area is lovely and we both really like Tiverton.

Posted by Beausoleil 16:04 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged uk exmoor lynton lynmouth dunster exmoor_national_park Comments (8)

May 18, 2018 — Tiverton and Knightshayes Court

We visited the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life in the morning, had another wonderful lunch at Frou Frou's and then drove to Knighthayes Court for the afternoon. Our last day in Devonshire.


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Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Our last day in Devon and we decided to visit the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life in the morning, make a lunch reservation at Frou Frou and then drive up to Knightshayes in the afternoon. Therefore, after breakfast we drove into Tiverton and parked. Made the easy two-minute walk to the museum, paid and entered. It looks small, but it’s very big and fascinating. It deals with prehistory, agriculture over the years, daily life over the years, the wool trade, the lace trade and finally the railway with a full-size locomotive in one gallery. The lace for Queen Victoria’s wedding dress was made in Tiverton and the lace for all Royal weddings since has been made here. We wondered if Meghan’s lace was made here for her wedding to Prince Harry tomorrow. No one seemed to know. We got to see almost everything and I bought bookplates for Angie and Scout in the gift shop. Ed took my picture on the locomotive too. Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life, Beck's Square, Tiverton EX16 6PJ; tel: +44 (0)1884 256295; tivertontic@tivertonmuseum.org.uk; Click here for the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life web site

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life - Carved clock and Queen Victoria

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life - Carved clock and Queen Victoria

Heathcoat-Amory Family Story

Heathcoat-Amory Family Story

Mangle Iron in the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Mangle Iron in the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life - the Tivvy Bumper

Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life - the Tivvy Bumper

Posing in the Tivvy Bumper - Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Posing in the Tivvy Bumper - Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Posing with a Mini Cooper in the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Posing with a Mini Cooper in the Tiverton Museum of Mid Devon Life

Frou Frou Café Bistro in Tiverton - a favorite

Frou Frou Café Bistro in Tiverton - a favorite


At that point we needed to walk fairly quickly to Frou Frou for our lunch reservation. Our table by the door was waiting as requested. Ed got the chicken wrapped in Parma ham with red pepper sauce and I got the lamb steak . . . both excellent. Ed got the cheesecake with passion fruit for dessert and I got the affogato with vanilla ice cream, two small macaroons and an espresso. The waitress remembered Ed liked ice in his water and I didn’t. It was fun. We’d met our waitress’s fiancé on Saturday. Starting to feel like home; time to move.

Knightshayes Court - Entrance Courtyard

Knightshayes Court - Entrance Courtyard

Stables at Knightshayes Court National Trust Site

Stables at Knightshayes Court National Trust Site


After lunch we drove up to Knightshayes Court, former home of the Heathcoat Amory family who donated it to the National Trust. All the guidebook information, including the National Trust, said not to use sat.-nav. (GPS) because it wasn’t accurate but we used Google Maps on my phone and it worked perfectly although we did carefully check road signs. We parked and walked to the house and through it. It’s very impressive although the docents were unusually quiet. After we toured the house, we walked through the beautiful gardens. When we left, Google failed us. I couldn’t get it to connect. Fortunately we remembered the way home but Google wouldn’t connect the entire way. We need it tomorrow to find our new cottage in the Cotswolds! Knightshayes Court, Bolham, Tiverton, Devon, EX16 7RQ; tel: +44 (0)1884 254665; Click here for the Knightshayes Court National Trust web site

View from Knightshayes Court

View from Knightshayes Court

Knightshayes Court - Entry

Knightshayes Court - Entry

Knightshayes Court - Stuffed bird in the Entry

Knightshayes Court - Stuffed bird in the Entry

Knightshayes Court - Dining Room

Knightshayes Court - Dining Room

Knightshayes Court - Library, my favorite room

Knightshayes Court - Library, my favorite room

Knightshayes Court - Stuffed bird in the Library

Knightshayes Court - Stuffed bird in the Library

Knightshayes Court - Billiard Room Decorations

Knightshayes Court - Billiard Room Decorations

Knightshayes Court - Stuffed bird in the Kitchen

Knightshayes Court - Stuffed bird in the Kitchen

Knightshayes Court - Staircase and Grandfather Clock

Knightshayes Court - Staircase and Grandfather Clock

Knightshayes Court - Bedroom

Knightshayes Court - Bedroom

Knightshayes Court - Sitting Room

Knightshayes Court - Sitting Room

Knightshayes Court - Bedroom with amazing painting

Knightshayes Court - Bedroom with amazing painting

Knightshayes Court - Garden

Knightshayes Court - Garden

Knightshayes Court - Garden Topiary with a view of the house

Knightshayes Court - Garden Topiary with a view of the house

Knightshayes Court - Garden

Knightshayes Court - Garden

Knightshayes Court - Garden

Knightshayes Court - Garden

Knightshayes Court - Taking our leave . . .

Knightshayes Court - Taking our leave . . .

I did get Google Maps on my phone working again. I think Vodafone went down in our area because LeFrench Mobile uses Vodafone in the UK. Fingers crossed for tomorrow . . .

Posted by Beausoleil 16:13 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged gardens museums uk devon devonshire tiverton knightshayes manor_houses Comments (3)

May 19, 2018 — Prince Harry and Meghan's wedding day

No, we weren't invited to the wedding and studiously avoided the entire area. We did have a lovely drive to the Cotswolds that day. We even had time for a brief visit to Lacock.


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Driving to Lacock on Prince Harry's Wedding Day

Driving to Lacock on Prince Harry's Wedding Day


Ah, the day of the Royal Wedding has arrived and that is the only thing on tv right now. The sun is shining so we’ll assume good weather and pack our raincoats in the trunk. We cleaned the house, packed up and loaded the car and called our landlady for checkout. She was there before I figured out how to hang up the phone.

Side of the Red Lion Inn

Side of the Red Lion Inn


We set off on our next adventure hoping all England would be at Meghan and Harry’s wedding but no such luck. We had traffic. We got to Lacock in jig time so parked for free at the National Trust parking lot and walked through the very pretty town. While walking, we checked menus and decided on The George Inn when the time arrived. There was a local art exhibit going on so we went in and discovered the Sacramento Fine Arts Center (SFAC) has better exhibits, but there were a couple nice pieces and it is always fun to see new art.

Corner of High and East Streets - Tithe Barn on Right

Corner of High and East Streets - Tithe Barn on Right

Corner of West and High Streets

Corner of West and High Streets

West Street Beside the WWI Memorial

West Street Beside the WWI Memorial

At the Sign of the Angel Restaurant and Rooms

At the Sign of the Angel Restaurant and Rooms

The Carpenters Arms

The Carpenters Arms

Local Art Exhibit

Local Art Exhibit

The George Inn

The George Inn


Noon arrived so we walked back to The George Inn and opened the restaurant. Ed got sea bass and I got duck confit. Both were incredibly good but came with different sides than were listed on the menu . . . strange. Ed got the Eton Mess for dessert and I got a chocolate brownie with chocolate sauce and chocolate ice cream. You can’t ruin a dessert like that. It was a good lunch in a beautiful old building. Especially fun was a mill-type wheel that is a dog-wheel. In olden times, a small dog ran inside the wheel to turn it which in turn rotated the very large meat rotisserie in the huge Inn fireplace. I hope they gave the poor dog a piece of the roasted meat for his efforts! The George Inn, 4 West St, Lacock, Chippenham SN15 2LH; tel: +44 (0)1249 730263; thegeorgelacock@wadworth.co.uk; Click here for The George Inn web site

The George Inn

The George Inn

St. Patricks Church in Corsham

St. Patricks Church in Corsham


We walked back to the car and drove to Corsham to find the church which we did with only a few wrong turns. Then drove back to the cottage to check in. Ten minutes early and no one was there so I telephoned the gal who was supposed to meet us and left a message. She showed up immediately, gave us the key and showed us around. It’s very nice but the kitchen is downstairs and the dining table is upstairs . . . a bit inconvenient but it’ll work. Our landlady is off at a family wedding today, not the Royal one! We unpacked and relaxed until time for church, then drove back to Corsham to get a precious parking place. They were just setting up for Mass so we were greeted profusely. It’s a very friendly church and they have lots of children so should be around for a while.

*****

St. Patrick's Church in Corsham

St. Patrick's Church in Corsham

The View from our upstairs window

The View from our upstairs window


After church my phone refused to load Google Maps. This is the second time. We’re not on Vodafone here; we’re on EE and they seem to have problems too. I hooked up our Garmin GPS and it actually worked and got us back to the house.

We’re thinking of Bath tomorrow . . .

Posted by Beausoleil 15:42 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged scenery uk devon cotswolds lacock devonshire Comments (9)

May 20, 2018 — Bath

Sunday is our favorite day to explore cities because there is often very little traffic and lots of parking. Bath was no exception. We had a grand time there.


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Bath, the bus we didn't take

Bath, the bus we didn't take


Sunday, the perfect day to visit Bath. The GPS took us directly to the Charlotte Street parking lot and we discovered not all the pay stations take credit cards, just the main one at entry. We didn’t discover this until after Ed had walked quite a way to get change for the machine near our car. Nuisance. At any rate, we paid and displayed then walked through the lovely city to the Roman Baths where the line was blessedly short. We paid and entered and took the free audio-phones. They worked well because you can listen to as much or as little as you like. We went through the whole complex and got our free cup of curative spring water so if we have anything, it’s cured. The Roman Baths, Stall St, Bath BA1 1LZ; Click here for The Roman Baths web site

The Stall Street Entrance to the Roman Baths and Bath Abbey

The Stall Street Entrance to the Roman Baths and Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey ahead, Roman Baths on the right

Bath Abbey ahead, Roman Baths on the right

This is the ticket hall

This is the ticket hall

The Roman Baths

The Roman Baths

Bath Abbey seen from the Roman Baths

Bath Abbey seen from the Roman Baths

There are some Interactive Exhibits

There are some Interactive Exhibits

Mosaic Floor in the Museum

Mosaic Floor in the Museum

The Roman Baths at Water Level

The Roman Baths at Water Level

Two Roman ladies sitting by the Baths

Two Roman ladies sitting by the Baths

Curative Waters from the Spring - Yes, you can drink the water.

Curative Waters from the Spring - Yes, you can drink the water.

Abbey Green with a wonderful classical guitarist

Abbey Green with a wonderful classical guitarist


After the Roman Baths, we went in search of lunch and walked over to the Abbey Green, a pretty little square, where a man was playing wonderful classical guitar, and we found the Crystal Palace Pub. We walked around noting a group of French students on tour. We looked around the area until the pub opened and went in and ordered our Sunday roast. This is a British custom we’ve really enjoyed. Ed got the beef and I got lamb. It was all good but not quite as good as Exeter. There was very loud music but the waitress turned it way down when I asked. I suspect it bothered her too. The Crystal Palace Pub, 10-11 Abbey St., Bath BA1 1NW; tel: +44 (0)1225 482666; crystalpalace@fullers.co.uk; Click here for the Crystal Palace Pub web site

The Crystal Palace Pub

The Crystal Palace Pub

Bath Abbey from Kingston Parade

Bath Abbey from Kingston Parade


After lunch we walked to Bath Abbey and “donated” 8 GBP to enter. The organist was playing and that was amazing. We wandered through the magnificant abbey although most of it is restoration following both the Reformation and WWII. Still, it is beautiful and the music added to it.

Then we walked past the weir up to Pulteney Bridge and over it taking the requisite photos. There was some sort of fair at the Parade Gardens along the river Avon but it cost to go down so we just enjoyed looking at it from the street above. Bath Abbey, Bath BA1 1LT, UK; Click here for Bath Abbey web site

Bath Abbey exterior and interior vaulting<br />Note the Angels climbing Jacob's Ladder on the Abbey front

Bath Abbey exterior and interior vaulting
Note the Angels climbing Jacob's Ladder on the Abbey front

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Nave of Bath Abbey with a plethora of tourists

Nave of Bath Abbey with a plethora of tourists

Bath Abbey - interior views with the Birde Chantry on the right

Bath Abbey - interior views with the Birde Chantry on the right

East end of the nave of Bath Abbey with the main altar

East end of the nave of Bath Abbey with the main altar

Bath Abbey - A very conveniently placed mirror lets you enjoy the fan vaulting above

Bath Abbey - A very conveniently placed mirror lets you enjoy the fan vaulting above

Bath Abbey Organ and Quire Angels

Bath Abbey Organ and Quire Angels

Festivities in the Parade Gardens

Festivities in the Parade Gardens

Pulteney Weir and Pulteney Bridge

Pulteney Weir and Pulteney Bridge

Pulteney Weir and Pulteney Bridge

Pulteney Weir and Pulteney Bridge

Shops on Pulteney Bridge

Shops on Pulteney Bridge

Reflections on Pulteney Bridge

Reflections on Pulteney Bridge

The Laura Fountain at the far end of Pulteney Bridge

The Laura Fountain at the far end of Pulteney Bridge

*****

We wandered a bit finding the car but managed without the GPS and easily drove home. I finished all Sandi’s updates for the AWS docent schedule and got that sent off to her before supper. Email is amazing. I can do volunteer work over five thousand thousand miles away.

Posted by Beausoleil 14:58 Archived in United Kingdom Tagged churches people cities abbeys bath uk roman_baths organs Comments (3)

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